Cricket

Australian speedster Shaun Tait retires from all forms of cricket

Australian speedster Shaun Tait has announced his retirement from all forms of the game at the age of 34, thus bringing down curtains on his injury-hit 15-year old career.

The pacer who made the headlines in the early part of his career due to express pace, played three tests, 35 ODIs and 21 T20Is for Australia. Tait played his last competitive game for Hobart Hurricanes against Sydney Thunders in the 2016-17 BBL, while his final international outing was against India in a T20I last year in January.

 

 

With a slingy action, Tait regularly used to breach the 150 kmph mark and once even clocked 161.2 km/h against England in 2010, considered as the second fastest delivery in the history of cricket. However, his best in Australian colours came in the 2007 ICC World Cup, where he snared 23 wickets, playing a pivotal role in the Aussie title triumph.

Speaking to ‘cricket.com.au’, Tait confessed that he wanted to play for couple of years more. But the nagging injuries and age seemed to catch up with the quick.

Tait revealed, “I honestly wanted to play a couple more years, whether it was over in the UK or here. I knew it was going to be difficult getting older to compete with the young blokes. But I didn't know it was going to be as difficult as it was this year (with the Hurricanes).”

 

 

He added, “The elbow has pretty much gone off a cliff now, it's done and dusted. I'm 34 years old and I suppose when you're not contributing on the field as much as you'd like to, it's time to finish up. If I was still performing really well, I'd probably do it (have surgery and keep playing). But I just wasn't. The game's getting quicker and better and I'm getting slower and a bit older. It's that simple."

He picked only 5 wickets in three tests, but his performance was comparatively better in the limited formats of the game. While he scalped 62 wickets in 35 ODIs at an average of 23.56, in 21 T20Is, he got the better of batsmen on 28 occasions at an economy of 7.39.

Click to comment

Most Popular

To Top